Masturbation Mythbusting: Is Squirt Pee?


Photo by Dainis Graveris on Unsplash Article by Holiday Molly


If your only experience with squirting is limited to seeing it in porn, you've probably convinced yourself that there's no way that act is real.


While there hasn't been as much research as other bodily functions dedicated to figuring out the science behind squirting, documentation of ejaculation in vulva owners goes all the way back to the kama sutra. And numerous studies since have found that some vulva owners do indeed expel fluid during orgasm. A study from 1984 concluded that 54% of vulva owners experienced an "orgasmic expulsion of fluid" at least one time and 14% experienced it almost every time they reached orgasm. A 2017 study concluded that 69% of vulva owners between 18 and 39 had experienced ejaculation during orgasm. So yes, squirting is real.


Squirt is pee


First, I want to clarify that there is some urine in precum and ejaculatory fluid in penis owners. So, yes - there is some pee in all ejaculate fluid, but it’s not all pee. It’s all a combination of ejaculatory fluid as well as urinary fluid. There is both urea and creatinine, which can be mistaken for urine. Ejaculate is an alkaline liquid, similar to prostate fluid; think of it like ejaculate from a penis without the sperm (like juice without pulp, if you will). The liquid is usually clear to yellowish, and thinner than the slippery lubrication vaginas create. If the similarity to pee still makes you feel uncomfortable, try peeing right before sexual activity. If your bladder isn’t full, you can rest assured that whatever’s coming out of you is not pee.


Vulva owners have tissue surrounding their urethra, called the urethral sponge. This is all part of the internal clitoris (the G-spot is the spot closest to the root of the clit) and is actually very similar to the erectile tissue in a penis. When you’re turned on, the clitoris and urethral sponge swell and essentially become erect. There are tiny glands in and right next to the urethra on the front wall of the vagina, called Skene’s or paraurethral glands, and they can fill with fluid when you’re turned on. The Skene gland is biologically similar to the prostate. Urine is present in the fluid because these glands are so close to the urethra. Part of the reason this myth is so unending is because, when vulva owners are going to squirt, they often feel like they have to pee. That feeling is misleading because when you’re turned on, the tissue around your urethra gets filled with blood, which will press against your bladder, making you feel like you need to pee. But trust me, it doesn’t mean you’re actually going to pee yourself. The simple solution? Go to the bathroom before playtime. So then, with an empty bladder, you can be confident that you’re squirting and definitely not peeing.


Squirting and Ejaculation are the same thing


These are harder to define since squirting isn’t a medical term and it’s hard to quantify colloquial terms. Squirting typically describes the release of a fluid that's clear and colorless, where ejaculation is used to describe the release of another kind of fluid that is often white and milky, includes prostate-specific antigens (PSAs) and other compounds found in semen. Squirting typically involves a larger amount of fluid being released, sometimes described as "gushing" or "geyser-like," whereas female ejaculation alone is usually a pretty small amount of fluid. These two different types of release can happen independently or simultaneously of one another. This makes it not only harder to research, but to explain the information. it's likely more accurate to say that there is ejaculation, which is the same as squirting.


All vulva-owners can squirt


So, yes and no. While I wouldn't tell anyone that they're incapable of squirting, I also wouldn't say that everyone squirts. This research suggests that anywhere between 10 and 50 percent of vulva owners noticed involuntary ejaculation. The issue is that it's not always obvious that it happened. If you've ever had sex and found yourself in a big wet spot on the bed, it's possible that you squirted without ever noticing. Think of it like sweating; while everyone sweats, some people sweat more than others. Some people's Skene's glands may be on the smaller side or simply less active than others, or there might be scar tissue blocking the ducts. You might be holding yourself back because you might mistakenly think you're going to pee. Or perhaps, you just might not have ever had their urethral sponge stimulated enough (or in the necessary way) to actually ejaculate. It can take a lot of exploration of your own body, just don't put too much pressure on yourself, it can be counterproductive.


The porn you’ve seen may make it look easy, but not everyone finds it pleasurable or even comfortable. The bottom line is Everyone is different. The body doesn’t follow rules for experiencing pleasure. The amount of liquid can also vary wildly from person to person. Some will squirt a lot, others might be more of a drip, while some can make puddles that look like they wet the bed. Typically the fluid expelled is only about a teaspoon and doesn’t usually make it across the room, but results will vary depending on your body.


Keep in mind that the clit is more than the little numb you can see. Think of an iceberg and how most of it is actually unseen under the water; the legs of the clitoris are the same, they criss cross through the pelvis under the skin wher